CCBER logo volume001
The Nature Press
This Issue   Director's Forward  
 




  ... a campus community dedicated to education, research and outreach of the region’s biological diversity and restoration.  
    Jennifer Thorsch      
  The office space under Harder Stadium recently evolved into a "hotspot" for biodiversity and ecological activity at UCSB. The Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) was formed in 2005 through the fusion of the Museum of Systematics and Ecology (MSE) and the Ecological Restoration Program.   Founded by the former Director, Wayne Ferren, the restoration program grew from MSE’s involvement in the study, preservation and restoration of rare wetland habitats in the vicinity of campus. The union of these elements into CCBER created a campus community dedicated to education, research and outreach of the region’s biological diversity and restoration.

The founders of the Herbarium and the Vertebrate Collections, Drs. CH Muller and Mary Erickson, respectively, with subsequent contributors to the botanical and zoological collections and programs represent some of last century’s leaders in ecology, behavior, plant structure and the development of modern systematics.   For over 60 years these valuable collections have contributed to the research and education missions of the University

In August 2005, CCBER moved to the Harder Building near Storke Field. The newly renovated facility includes a state of the art classroom, CH Muller Conference Room and Library, separate rooms for the specimen collections and interpretative displays developed by the CCBER staff.  We thank our many donors and friends both on and off campus who have contributed to the development of the Cheadle Center.

The role and mission of CCBER expanded during the past decade with new responsibilities for managing and restoring many of the biologically diverse natural areas on campus including the Lagoon, North Bluff, Storke Wetlands, Manzanita Village and most recently the San Clemente Housing project.   This role enhances the academic interest in conservation and the teaching and research opportunities for faculty and students while providing a focal point for restoration ecology studies campus wide.

 

CCBER New Center
  New Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration at Harder South       Photo by Jim Bartsch  
 
 
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