CCBER lgog Volume001
Ecological Restoration
In This Issue   New Restoration and Enhancement Project  
  Director's Foreword 1
  Ecological Restoration 3
  Education 5
 
        Collections 8
        Field Notes 9
  Research 12
  15
  18
  20
  21
   


  The SMS will provide on-site natural filtration and treatment of 100% of storm and irrigation water before it enters local wetlands and the ground water system.  







  In addition to water quality improvement, the SMS will provide important wetland habitat for birds and other wildlife species.  
    Melanie Powers      
  CCBER recently began work on the San Clemente Graduate Student Housing Habitat Restoration and Enhancement Project. The 5.6-acre project is located along El Colegio Road between Los Carneros and Stadium Road. It includes a Stormwater Management System (SMS), southern tarplant (Centromadia parryi ssp. australis) and vernal wetland conservation and enhancement, grassland and oak woodland restoration, and a coastal sage scrub border. All native plants for the project will be propagated from local genotypes at CCBER’s greenhouse and nursery.

The SMS will provide on-site natural filtration and treatment of 100% of storm and irrigation water before it enters local wetlands and the ground water system. Storm and irrigation water collected from the 11.5 acre housing site will enter the SMS at a single drainpipe. Once the water enters the SMS, it flows through a series of swales and large detention basins. Native wetland species including sedges, rushes, and grasses will be planted in the basins. These plants and microbes in the soil will assist in the uptake of nutrients and help to break down other pollutants. Water monitoring of the inflow and outflow of the system will be conducted to determine the efficacy of the SMS. In addition to water quality improvement, the SMS will provide important wetland habitat for birds and other wildlife species.

During the initial biological survey of the site, a rare annual plant species, southern tarplant (Centromadia parryi ssp. australis), and three vernal wetlands were discovered. Southern tarplant is listed 1B.1 by the California Native Plant Society, meaning it is rare, threatened, and seriously endangered in California. Several patches of southern tarplant have been conserved, and we will be working to create new habitat for this species throughout the site. Three vernal wetlands, which contain few native species and many exotics, currently exist at the project site. We will be working to enhance the wetlands and wetland buffer areas by removing the exotic species and planting natives. The southern tarplant and vernal wetlands will be monitored over the next five years to determine if these areas meet the performance standards set forth by the California Coastal Commission.

 
  Centromadia parryi ssp. australis  
  The locally rare California native southern tarplant (Centromadia parryi ssp. australis)
found at the San Clemente project site.
 
   
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