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UCSB Natural History Collection News

The natural history collections side of CCBER will be having weekly informal research seminars, with several guest speakers planned. If you are interested in natural history or collections research, come join every Wednesday from 5-6pm in CCBER's classroom! Read on for schedule of presenters and more. 


Capturing California’s Flowers: - a new resource for detecting the link between flowering time and climate.
 
 
In California, thousands of native pollinator, bird, and mammal species depend on native flowering plants for the pollen, nectar, fruits, and seeds they provide. In turn, the flowering time of California native plants determines the abundance and availability of these food sources during our brief seasonal flowering periods.  How will this availability change in response to climate change?  A new National Science Foundation (NSF) grant provided to UC Santa Barbara and collaborators throughout California will help answer this question.

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Upcoming Events

CCBER Herbarium Digitization Technician Job Announcement

The Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration (CCBER) at UC Santa Barbara is seeking applicants for an Herbarium Digitization Technician at the UCSB Herbarium. Come join our team!


Monitoring Food Web Development at NCOS: Rodents & Reptiles

A long-term goal of the North Campus Open Space (NCOS) restoration project is to develop a diverse, multi-level food web, which is often a good indicator of a healthy, well-functioning ecosystem. Read our latest feature story about two components of the food web we have recently begun monitoring: small mammals such as mice and voles, and reptiles.


Stories from Year 3 of Vegetation Monitoring at NCOS

This summer, CCBER conducted the 3rd year of vegetation monitoring at the North Campus Open Space restoration project. With three years of this data, we can now see more clearly how the restoration is progressing, and where more work or a change in management may be needed. Here we report on some of this year’s data and what it is telling us.


North Campus Open Space Restoration Project

NCOS News - November 2020

Subscribe to NCOS News here.

Updates - Grant and Donor Funds help construct a new parking lot and outdoor classroom, and student workers discuss the importance and value of NCOS

Feature Story - Monitoring Food Web Development at NCOS: Rodents & Reptiles

Community Forum and Photos - Highlighting use of restored trees by birds, also some common, everyday birds, and a fluffy mouse nest.

Read the full newsletter here

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